Survey: IQSA Annual Meeting User Experience

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As the 2018 IQSA Annual Meeting in Denver, Colorado (November 16-19) approaches, the International Qur’anic Studies Association seeks feedback from its members and affiliates on last year’s Annual Meeting in Boston, MA. Glance back at the 2017 Program Book, reflect on your experience last November, and take THIS SURVEY!

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Your feedback is very important to IQSA and its success as one of the only learned societies dedicated to the critical study of the Qur’an. We look forward to seeing you in November!

 

 

© International Qur’anic Studies Association, 2018. All rights reserved.

Review of Qur’anic Research, Vol. 4 no. 7 (2018)

In the latest installment of the Review of Qur’anic Research (Vol. 4, no.7), W. Richard Oakes, Jr. (Independent Scholar) reviews Nevin Reda’s The al-Baqara Crescendo: Understanding the Qur’an’s Style, Narrative Structure, and Running Themes (Montreal: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2017).

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In his review, Oakes writes… “In The al-Baqara Crescendo, Nevin Reda does an exceptional job of describing the Qur’ān in the vocabulary of art, aesthetics, acoustics, chanting, song, music, the rhythms and rhymes of orally-recited poetry, poetic-like rhetorical devices, and German terminology. Her emotive vocabulary and accessible writing style lures the reader into a feeling that her approach is holistic and that Sūrat al-Baqarah is coherent…”

Want to read more? For full access to the Review of Qur’anic Research (RQR), members can log in HERE. Not an IQSA member? Join today to enjoy RQR and additional member benefits!

 

© International Qur’anic Studies Association, 2018. All rights reserved.

Second Aramaic & Syriac Studies Conference at the Cairo University 2019

The Department of Oriental Languages will hold its Second Aramaic and Syriac Studies Conference at the Cairo University (Egypt) between February-March of 2019.

Conference Panels Include:
Grammar and Linguistic Studies
Arabic, Hebrew, Greek and Syriac Rhetoric
Armenian and Syriac Studies
Arabic and Syriac Studies
Comparative Semitic and Syriac Studies
Archaeological studies
lnscriptions and Graffity
Old and modern Aramaic
Old and modern Syriac/Suryat
Ancient and modern Aramaic/Syriac Literature
Diaspora and Migration Studies|
Ancient and contemporary Theater and Story Studies
Travel Liteartures
Establishment of ancient and modern Syriac Schools
Dialog with Jewish and Islam
Translation of OT, NT, and Quran into Syriac
Renaissance literature/Studies
Jewish, Greek, Islamic,and Syriac Legal Texts
Christian arabic Studies
Karshoni Studies
Digital Studies in Syriac Heritage

Abstracts and Papers will be accepted until the end July 2018, and completed papers until the end August 2018.

Applications for attendance by observers are welcome and should be submitted by July 2018.

Conference Fees
US Fees include paper publication, accommodations, meals (3 days), a trip to new Library of Alexandria, and city tour.

  • Fees are $100.00 USD for Speakers without accommodations.
  • Fees for speaker attendance excluding paper publication are $350.00 USD (include accommodations, all meals for 3 nights)

Accommodations at University Hotel:

  • Limited single rooms, double and triple rooms available
  • Families should apply by the end July for suitable accomodations

Questions? Contact secondcairoconference@gmail.com

 

*Content and images courtesy of http://arts.cu.edu.eg/  and Prof. Dr. Salah Abdel Aziz Mahgoub Edris.

Publisher’s Corner – The Koran in English: A Biography

The Koran in English: A Biography

The untold story of how the Arabic Qur’an became the English Koran

 

For millions of Muslims, the Qur’an is sacred only in Arabic, the original Arabic in which it was revealed to the Prophet Muhammad in the seventh century; to many Arab and non-Arab believers alike, the book literally defies translation. Yet English translations exist and are growing, in both number and importance. Bruce Lawrence tells the remarkable story of the ongoing struggle to render the Qur’an’s lyrical verses into English—and to make English itself an Islamic language.

The “Koran” in English revisits the life of Muhammad and the origins of the Qur’an before recounting the first translation of the book into Latin by a non-Muslim: Robert of Ketton’s twelfth-century version paved the way for later ones in German and French, but it was not until the eighteenth century that George Sale’s influential English version appeared. Lawrence explains how many of these early translations, while part of a Christian agenda to “know the enemy,” often revealed grudging respect for their Abrahamic rival. British expansion in the modern era produced an anomaly: fresh English translations—from the original Arabic—not by Arabs or non-Muslims but by South Asian Muslim scholars.

The first book to explore the complexities of this translation saga, The “Koran” in English also looks at cyber Korans, versions by feminist translators, and now a graphic Koran, the American Qur’an created by the acclaimed visual artist Sandow Birk.*

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Author: Bruce B. Lawrence is the Nancy and Jeffrey Marcus Humanities Professor Emeritus of Religion at Duke University. His many books include Who Is Allah?; New Faiths, Old Fears: Muslims and Other Asian Immigrants in American Religious Life; and Shattering the Myth: Islam beyond Violence (Princeton). He lives in Hillsborough, North Carolina.

ISBN13: 978069115586
ISBN (ebook): 9781400887798
Publication Date: 2017
Publisher: Princeton University Press

 

*Content courtesy of Princeton University Press

 

The Future of Syriac Studies and the Legacy of Sebastian P. Brock, Sigtuna, Sweden, June 12 – 15, 2018

To celebrate Sebastian P. Brock’s 80th birthday, Sankt Ignatios Theological Academy and Stockholm School of Theology, Sweden, hosted a conference on the Future of Syriac Studies” in Sigtuna Sweden. The conference was partly funded by the Swedish Foundation for Humanities and Social Sciences. Participants from the US and Europe, the Middle East, Australia and Japan were welcomed to the conference by Michael Hjälm, (Sankt Ignatios Academy, Södertälje/Stockholm), Samuel Rubenson, (Lund/Sankt Ignatios Academy, Södertälje /Stockholm) and Archbishop Mor Polycarpus Augin Aydin (Syriac Orthodox Church in the Netherlands/Sankt Ignatios Seminary, Södertälje /Suryoye Seminary, Salzburg), who gave an overview of Sebastian Brock’s academic contribution to Syriac studies over the last half a century. George Kiraz (Gorgias Press) presented Professor Brock with the first edition of Gorgias Press’ new Sebastianoye series, developed in his honour 

As well as a wide range of papers on Eastern Christian subjects, the conference included a number of presentations that intersected with Islamic and qur’ānic studies, underlining the importance of Syriac and Syriac studies for research on the Qur’ān and early Islam.

Stephen J. Shoemaker (Oregan) discussed Syriac apocalypticism in light of the rise of Islam, stressing the importance of non-Islamic sources for understanding the emergence of Islam. From the sixth century onwards, Christians, Jews, and even Zoroastrians, believed they were living at the beginning of the end of time, Syriac apocalyptic writings, in particular, are therefore useful for understanding the rise of Islam. Professor Shoemaker concluded that Muhammad’s group of Believers can best/better be understood against the backdrop of this apocalyptic fervor, as eschatological expectations reached a peak in the seventh century.

Rachel Claire Dryden (Cambridge) presented a state of the field review of qur’ānic studies in relation to the role of Syriac. With few exceptions, the importance of Syriac literature for understanding the Qur’ān appears to have been ignored, or at least neglected, by scholars until the beginning of the current millennium. As well as highlighting current research on the Qur’ān that takes Syriac into account, Miss Dryden stressed the need for further collaboration between scholars of the Qur’ān and of Syriac, which has the potential to benefit both fields, by revealing more about the nature of Late Antique monotheistic debate and exchange.

Bert Jacobs (Leuven) examined Syriac translations of the Qur’ān, which has received little attention compared to translations into Greek and Latin. Dr Jacobs concluded that this may be because it is still not clear what qur’anic material is extant in Syriac, or even whether there was a full Syriac translation of the Qur’an. Dr Jacobs argued that there had never been a full Syriac translation, firstly because it would have been irrelevant to Syriac-speaking Christians, before becoming unnecessary, as Arabic became the language of Arab Christians.

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Venue for the Syriac music performance at the conclusion of the evening’s events.  Photo Credit: Rachel Dryden

As part of Professor Brock’s 80th birthday celebrations, Mor Dioscoros Benyamin Atas, one of two archbishops of the Syriac Orthodox Church in Sweden and Scandinavia presented him with the Order of Sankt Ignatios for 2018, in recognition of his contribution to Syriac studies and his championing of the rights of the Syriac people. The evening concluded with a performance of Syriac music.

Huge thanks goes to Miriam and Michael Hjälm, Bob Kitchen and Gabriel Bar Sawame for the initiative and organization of the conference, which brought so many scholars of Syriac from different fields together in an environment that encouraged interaction and exchange.

Conference proceedings will be published in due course.

© International Qur’anic Studies Association, 2018. All rights reserved.

Review of Qur’anic Research, Vol. 4 no. 6 (2018)

In the latest installment of the Review of Qur’anic Research (Vol. 4, no.6), David S. Powers (Cornell University) reviews The Study Qur’an: A New Translation and Commentary edited by Seyyed Hossein Nasr, Caner K. Dagli, Maria Massi Dakake, Joseph E. B. Lumbard, and Mohammed Rustom (New York: HarperOne, 2015).

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In his review, Powers writes… “Following in the footsteps of the Harper Collins Study Bible and the Jewish Study Bible, The Study Quran is a welcome addition to the field of qurʾānic studies. In response to a proposal from the publisher, the distinguished Islamicist Seyyed Hossein Nasr agreed to serve as the Editor-in-Chief and general supervisor of the project on the condition that the team of scholars who carried out this monumental task would include only Muslim scholars who accept the Qurʾān “as the word of God and an authentic revelation” (xl)…The three General Editors have produced a new translation of the Qurʾān that seeks to convey what the Arabic text actually says rather than what later commentators and/or translators said that it means (xlii). The stated goal of the commentary is to clarify difficult passages, to explain the inner meaning of the text, “when necessary,” and, generally, to provide a “reasonable account” of what Muslim authorities have said about the text as it relates, inter alia, to ritual, law, theology, ethics, metaphysics, spirituality, and sacred history (xliii)…”

Want to read more? For full access to the Review of Qur’anic Research (RQR), members can log in HERE. Not an IQSA member? Join today to enjoy RQR and additional member benefits!

 

© International Qur’anic Studies Association, 2018. All rights reserved.

JIQSA V.1 Now Available on JSTOR

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Dear Friends and Colleagues,

This month marks another important milestone for the International Qur’anic Studies Association. Our journal–the Journal of the International Qur’anic Studies Association (JIQSA)–is now accessible through the online academic digital library JSTOR. Libraries and other institutions with a subscription to JSTOR can access JIQSA 1 (2016) HERE. This priceless partnership is the fruit of tireless years of work, and it is a testament to the culture of scholarship and collegiality fostered within IQSA. Our partnership helps fulfill IQSA’s Mission and Vision. Giving the world access to JIQSA through JSTOR encourages and facilities digital technology in the discipline and promotes cooperation across global boundaries.

This mutual cooperation would not have been possible without the help and generosity of our colleagues. From IQSA, special thanks go to Vanessa De Gifis, Michael Pregill and Anne Marie McLean. From JSTOR, my heartfelt gratitude goes to Jason Przybylski and Nicole Manfredo.

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Finally, I use this fortuitous occasion to invite you all, if you have not already, to JOIN IQSAADVERTISE with us and SUPPORT our work! IQSA is an independent, member-funded 501(c)3 learned society. It offers five competitive membership rates–starting at just $25–and FREE online access to JIQSA, as well as newly reduced advertising rates. (IQSA members will continue to enjoy FREE access to JIQSA through our membership portal, in addition to JSTOR access through institutions)

On behalf of the Board of Directors and Standing Committees, I congratulate all current IQSA members and welcome new members to their ranks.

Sincerely,

Emran El-Badawi, Executive Director

© International Qur’anic Studies Association, 2018. All rights reserved.

2018 IQSA Annual Meeting FAQs

Have questions about the 2018 IQSA Annual Meeting to be held in Denver, Colorado from November 16-19, 2018. We have answers! Read up on some Frequently Asked Questions about this year’s annual meeting below:

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ANNUAL MEETING FAQs

Q: What are the dates of IQSA’s Annual Meeting?
A:
The IQSA Annual Meeting begins and ends November 16-19, 2018 one day before the regular SBL/AAR Meeting.

Q: How do I register for the Annual Member as an IQSA member?
A:
Register as an AFFILIATE MEMBER on SBL’s Meetings and Events page. Scroll to the bottom of the page for the Affiliate link and choose “International Qur’anic Studies Association” in the drop-down menu.

Q: Do I have to be an IQSA member to register for the Annual Meeting?
A: 
YES – current IQSA membership is required and verified by staff upon registration. However, SBL/AAR membership is not required to attend the IQSA Annual Meeting. You can renew your IQSA membership HERE.

Q: I already registered for the Annual Meeting as an SBL/AAR member. Do I have to register again as an affiliate to attend IQSA events?
A:
No – duplicate registration is not required to attend IQSA events if one has already registered as an SBL/AAR member.

Q: Where can I find a schedule of events for the Annual Meeting?
A: 
IQSA  and SBL/AAR’s Program Book will be distributed in print and online as the meeting date draws closer. Members can chose to access the Program Book via mobile app, online, or in print while completing the registration process.

Q: Where can I find information about Housing and Travel Accommodations?
A: Visit SBL’s Meetings and Events page and/or choose your hotel during your online registration.

Q: Does IQSA provide funding or reimbursement for its members to attend the meeting?
A: 
At this time, IQSA does not have the resources to provide financial assistance for housing and travel at the Annual Meeting. However, IQSA encourages its members to seek financial aid through institutional grants and other funding.

Q: I will be traveling internationally. How do I obtain a non-immigrant Visa Letter?
A: Check the required box during online registration (see below) and email contact@iqsaweb.org to arrange for a Visa Letter.

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The Annual Meeting includes panels for each of IQSA’s six program units:

We look forward to seeing you in Denver!

© International Qur’anic Studies Association, 2018. All rights reserved.