JIQSA Volume 5 (2020) Now Available!

cover_issue_39_en_USIQSA is thrilled to announce that the fifth volume of the Journal of the International Qur’anic Studies Association (founding editors: Michael Pregill and Vanessa De Gifis) has now been published online, with print copies due to ship soon (see also https://lockwoodonlinejournals.com/index.php/jiqsa). 

The issue’s contents include:

  • an obituary of the historian F. E. Peters by Reuven Firestone;
  • an exploration of Qur’anic doublets, drawing on studies of doublets in the New Testament, and the implication of such doublets for the history of the Qur’an’s origin and composition, by Gabriel Said Reynolds;
  • a close examination of a Copto-Qur’anic palimpsest by Éléonore Cellard and Catherine Louis, inspecting both the Qur’anic upper text and the biblical Coptic lower text, and considering the implications of the palimpsest for early Qur’anic scribal practices;
  • a study of the opening oath and the Prophet’s visions in Sūrat al-Najm by Saqib Hussain, in light of pre-Islamic astral concerns in the Qur’anic milieu as recoverable from early Islamic literature and Safaitic inscriptions;
  • an analysis of the regionality of early Qur’an manuscripts by Hythem Sidky, based on a comparison between variants in regional codices as recorded by Muslim scholars and regionality data recoverable from surviving Qur’an manuscripts;
  • and an Arabic article by Nadeen Alsulaimi on the structure of Sūrat al-Insān and on whether it should be classified as Meccan or Medinan.

Editor of Volume 5, Dr. Nicolai Sinai (Oxford University), notes that many thanks are owed for the hard work and commitment that went into the publication of this volume: to all authors for contributing such a rich selection of pioneering research; to our anonymous peer reviewers for making available their expertise and for offering many constructive and learned comments on those submissions that did make it into the issue; to the journal’s associate editor Saqib Hussain (who is still blissfully ignorant of the reviewers of his own submission); and to Billie Jean Collins of Lockwood Press for unfailing professional standards. It is especially gratifying that the issue includes revised and extended versions of two past winners of IQSA’s Andrew Rippin Best Paper Prize (namely, the contributions by Cellard/Louis and Hussain).

Member Access

Full online access to the Journal of the International Qur’anic Studies Association is available by signing in to the member portal at iqsaweb.org HERE. Use the top menu to navigate to “JIQSA” and select the desired volume via the drop-down menu. Online access to JIQSA is NOT  available via Lockwood Press’ website.

If you experience trouble logging in, please email contactus@iqsaweb.org to reset your password or confirm your membership.

Renew or sign up for IQSA membership HERE for full access to JIQSA, RQR, and more!

Institutional Access

Institutions wishing to subscribe for print and/or online access should fill out the form HERE. Print subscriptions are also available for individual subscribers via THIS FORM.

© International Qur’anic Studies Association, 2021. All rights reserved.

Workshop/Webinar: Princeton-UCLA Arabic Manuscript Workshop

manworkThe Princeton-UCLA Arabic Manuscript Workshop will be held on August 23-27, 2021. Full details for the workshop can be found here, including signup details and a complete list of presenters. While the application process is now closed for full participation, interested readers can still sign up for the webinars online at the official website.

Description: This week-long workshop will be led by leading authorities in the historical, philological and material study of Arabic manuscripts. Co-organized by Princeton and UCLA, which house the two largest repositories of Islamicate manuscripts in North America, the workshop will equip emerging scholars with the basic tools to conduct research using original handwritten texts in Arabic script. Over the course of four days, participants will learn the basics of codicology, palaeography, and manuscript production and circulation, and receive exposure to an expansive vision of current debates in Arabic manuscript research. Topics include:

  • anatomy of the codex 
  • text blocks, colophons, audition notes, owners’ notes, readers’ notes
  • supports, inks, bindings
  • scribes and other craftspeople
  • scripts, canonical and informal; strategies for decipherment
  • technical terminology
  • transmission practices and patterns
  • digital collections; contemporary ethics and best practices

Organizers: Marina Rustow (Princeton) and Luke Yarbrough (UCLA)

For questions about the application process, contact cnes@international.ucla.edu.

For questions about content, contact the organizers: Marina Rustow (Princeton) and Luke Yarbrough (UCLA).

© International Qur’anic Studies Association, 2021. All rights reserved.

New Online Resource: The Historical Index of the Medieval Middle East

logoThe Historical Index of the Medieval Middle East (HIMME) is a new research tool for exploring the people, places, and practices of the most diverse part of the premodern world, through primary sources chosen from a wide range of literary languages and cultures. A series of webinars will introduce HIMME to scholars by exploring some of the resources now available to scholars through this tool.

Project Description: The Historical Index of the Medieval Middle East will provide a synthetic reference work identifying sources referring to particular people, places, and practices (such as jizya, the poll-tax paid by non-Muslims under Islamic rule). Its temporal scope is from 600 to 1550, and its geographical scope from al-Andalus in the west to Samarqand in the east, from Yemen in the south to the Caucasus in the north. Each entry will correspond to an individual person, place, or social practice, and will list the references to that entity which have been gathered so far. Rather than restricting its attention to sources in Arabic or any other single language, it will deliberately incorporate sources from as many languages as possible. This will help the scholarly community quickly locate primary sources relevant for medieval Middle Eastern topics, and scholars may consider HIMME’s citations when deciding which languages to learn. The broader public will find brief identifications of the people, places, and practices, and references to translations of primary sources where available. The digital humanities community will find the canonical data records encoded in TEI, published on GitHub as they become available. The project is a work in progress, publishing its citations as they are collected, rather than waiting to publish an authoritative “final” reference work. Instead, HIMME will grow over time, becoming steadily more useful as it incorporates the references from additional sources.

For more information on this project, visit the website here. Interested readers can also find information on Zoom webinars here.

© International Qur’anic Studies Association, 2021. All rights reserved.

JIQSA Volume 5 (2020) Now Available!

IQSA is proud to announce the official release of the Journal of the International Qur’anic Studies Association V.5 2020 (Lockwood Press) edited by Nicolai Sinai (Oxford University). Read the announcement below!

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Dear colleagues,

It is my pleasure to announce that the fifth volume of the Journal of the International Qur’anic Studies Association (founding editors: Michael Pregill and Vanessa De Gifis) has now been published online, with print copies due to ship soon (see also https://lockwoodonlinejournals.com/index.php/jiqsa). The issue’s contents include:

  • an obituary of the historian F. E. Peters by Reuven Firestone;
  • an exploration of Qur’anic doublets, drawing on studies of doublets in the New Testament, and the implication of such doublets for the history of the Qur’an’s origin and composition, by Gabriel Said Reynolds;
  • a close examination of a Copto-Qur’anic palimpsest by Éléonore Cellard and Catherine Louis, inspecting both the Qur’anic upper text and the biblical Coptic lower text, and considering the implications of the palimpsest for early Qur’anic scribal practices;
  • a study of the opening oath and the Prophet’s visions in Sūrat al-Najm by Saqib Hussain, in light of pre-Islamic astral concerns in the Qur’anic milieu as recoverable from early Islamic literature and Safaitic inscriptions;
  • an analysis of the regionality of early Qur’an manuscripts by Hythem Sidky, based on a comparison between variants in regional codices as recorded by Muslim scholars and regionality data recoverable from surviving Qur’an manuscripts;
  • and an Arabic article by Nadeen Alsulaimi on the structure of Sūrat al-Insān and on whether it should be classified as Meccan or Medinan.

As in previous years, I owe thanks to many people for getting this issue out: to all authors for contributing such a rich selection of pioneering research; to our anonymous peer reviewers for making available their expertise and for offering many constructive and learned comments on those submissions that did make it into the issue; to the journal’s associate editor Saqib Hussain (who is still blissfully ignorant of the reviewers of his own submission); and to Billie Jean Collins of Lockwood Press for unfailing professional standards. It is especially gratifying that the issue includes revised and extended versions of two past winners of IQSA’s Andrew Rippin Best Paper Prize (namely, the contributions by Cellard/Louis and Hussain).

Since access to the journal is a membership benefit, JIQSA 5 is also available through the IQSA membership portal. However, please do consider recommending a subscription to the journal to your libraries, in the interest of making JIQSA available to students and colleagues who are not yet IQSA members.

Best wishes,
Nicolai

———————————————————————————————-
Dr Nicolai Sinai
Editor, Journal of the International Qur’anic Studies Association
Professor of Islamic Studies, Faculty of Oriental Studies, University of Oxford
Fellow of Pembroke College
© International Qur’anic Studies Association, 2021. All rights reserved.

Review of Qur’anic Research, Vol. 7 no. 5 (2021)

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In the latest installment of the Review of Qur’anic Research (Vol. 7, no.5), Holger Zellentin (Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen) reviews Zishan Ahmad Ghaffar’s Der Koran in seinem religions- und weltgeschichtlichen Kontext: Eschatologie und Apokalyptik in den mittelmekkanischen Suren (Leiden: Ferdinand Schöningh / Brill, 2020).

rqr 7 5 bookIn the review, Zellentin writes “In Ghaffar’s view, the Qurʾān retells and transforms many of the historical and eschatological narratives circulating at its time, and especially those suggesting or even explicating the messianic role of Byzantine Emperor Heraclius, who ruled 610–641 CE. Instead of prevalent messianic and apocalyptic imperial ideologies, according to Ghaffar, the middle Meccan sūrahs – in arguable contrast to the later Medinan ones – offer a theology of individual piety and divine mercy that portrays the only relevant eschatological battle between good and evil as occurring within each individual, rather than on the world stage…”

Want to read more? For full access to the Review of Qur’anic Research (RQR), members can log in HERE. Not an IQSA member? Join today to enjoy RQR and additional member benefits!

© International Qur’anic Studies Association, 2021. All rights reserved.

Conference: Umayyad Syria: A Context for the Qur’an ?

UMR

IQSA is excited to announce an upcoming conference hosted by the University of Strasbourg: Umayyad Syria: A Context for the Qur’an? Please see the English/French announcement below for details, including details on how to register and watch the conference online. 

 La Syrie omeyyade, un contexte pour le Coran ?

Colloque international interdisciplinaire

Université de Strasbourg, 2-3-4 juin 2021

Umayyad Syria: A Context for the Qur’an ?

International interdisciplinary colloquium

University of Strasbourg, 2-3-4 June 2021


À la jonction des études coraniques et de l’histoire, ce colloque entend interroger l’évolution et la place du texte coranique aux débuts de l’Islam dans un contexte spatial et temporel déterminé : la région centrale de la Syrie-Palestine (Bilād al-Shām) sous la dynastie califale omeyyade (661-750). Le but est de favoriser les échanges entre des spécialistes de l’espace syrien à l’époque omeyyade (historiens, littéraires, papyrologues, archéologues) et des spécialistes du texte coranique (islamologues, philologues, codicologues) pour faire le point et avancer de nouvelles pistes sur le Coran dans la Syrie omeyyade.

At the crossroads of Qur’anic studies and History, this conference intends to investigate the evolution and place of the Qur’anic text in early Islam within a specific spatial and temporal context: the central region of Syria and Palestine (Bilād al-Shām) under the Umayyad caliphate dynasty (661-750). The aim is to foster exchanges between specialists of the Syrian area in the Umayyad period (historians, papyrologists, specialists of literature, archaeologists) and specialists of the Qur’anic text (among which specialists of Islam as a religion (“islamologues”), philologists, codicologists) in order to gather the latest academic studies on the Qur’an in Umayyad Syria and propose new directions of research.

Ce colloque interdisciplinaire international est organisé par Anne-Sylvie Boisliveau (Maître de Conférences, Université de Strasbourg, UMR 7044 Archimède)  et Mathilde Boudier (PhD, Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne, UMR 8167 Orient & Méditerranée), avec la coopération d’Éric Vallet (Professeur en études arabes, Université de Strasbourg). Ce colloque est hébergé au laboratoire UMR7044 Archimède (CNRS / Université de Strasbourg) ; il est soutenu par un financement du Bureau Central des Cultes dans le cadre de la commission « Islam, Religion et Société » des Ministères et un financement de l’ITI Hisaar (Université de Strasbourg).

This interdisciplinary and international colloquium is organized by par Anne-Sylvie Boisliveau (Assistant Professor, Université de Strasbourg, UMR 7044 Archimède) and Mathilde Boudier (PhD, Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne, UMR 8167 Orient & Méditerranée), with the cooperation of Éric Vallet (Full Professor in Arabic Studies, Université de Strasbourg). It is hosted by UMR7044 Archimède laboratory (CNRS/University of Strasbourg, France) and funded by a grant awarded by the Bureau Central des Cultes withing the framework of the « Islam, Religion and Society » commission of the French Ministries, and a funding awarded by the ITI Hisaar (Interdisciplinary Institute for History, Sociology, Archaeology and Anthropology of Religions, of the University of Strasbourg).

Le colloque sera en français et en anglais. The colloquium will be in French and English.

Pour assister au colloque en direct, rendez-vous sur la chaîne youtube de la MISHA 

NB : Pour les chercheurs ou étudiants désireux de participer au colloque en ligne avec possibilité de poser des questions, une inscription est disponible (sous réserve : nombre de places limité pour préserver la qualité des échanges) en demandant envoyant un email avec pour titre « Inscription colloque » à Mathilde Boudier .

Le colloque est aussi enregistré et sera disponible en ligne (lien à venir après le colloque sur cette page web .

Venue : To follow the colloquium online, please join the MISHA YouTube . Researchers and students interested in participating online directly may register in limited number by sending an email to Mathilde Boudier (email title “Inscription colloque”).

The colloquium will be filmed and available online: a link will appear later on this webpage http://archimede.unistra.fr/activites-de-recherche/programmes-de-recherche/equipes/equipe-i-territoires-et-empires-dorient-teo/la-syrie-omeyyade-un-contexte-pour-le-coran/

Participants :

Sean W. ANTHONY (The Ohio State University)
Mohamed BAKHOUCH (Aix-Marseille Université/IREMAM)
Nicolet BOEKHOFF-VAN DER VOORT (Radboud University)
Antoine BORRUT (University of Maryland)
Hassan BOUALI (Université Paris Nanterre)
Hassan CHAHDI (Collège de France) (t.b.c.)
Arianna D’OTTONE RAMBACH (Sapienza – Università di Roma)
Bastien DUMONT (Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne)
Guillaume DYE (Université libre de Bruxelles)
Mattia GUIDETTI (University of Bologna)
Steven C. JUDD (Southern Connecticut State University)
Thierry LEGRAND (Université de Strasbourg)
Paul NEUENKIRCHEN (GIS MOMM)
Mehdy SHADDEL (University of Leiden)
Éric VALLET (Université de Strasbourg)

Programme / Program :

Horaire local / Time is in Paris Time (UTC +2) = CEST (Central European Summer Time)

Mercredi 2 juin

13.30-14.00 Accueil général et introduction / Official welcome and introduction

14.00-15.20 Histoire et Études Coraniques : Communication inaugurale à 2 voix / History and Qur’anic Studies: 2-voices Introduction

15.30-19.00 Session 1 : Le Coran et les ambitions impériales omeyyades / The Qur’an and Umayyad Struggle for Imperial Power

Jeudi 3 juin

10.00-12.00 Session 2 : La Syrie comme contexte de composition et de canonisation du Coran / Syria as a Context for Qur’anic Composition & Canonization

14.00-17.30 Session 3 : Usages sociaux du Coran : lire le Coran dans la Syrie omeyyade / Reading the Qur’an in Umayyad Syria : Social Meanings.

Vendredi 4 juin

13.00-16.30 Session 4 : Le Coran dans les rapports entre musulmans et chrétiens en Syrie omeyyade / Qur’an in Muslim-Christian Relations in Umayyad Syria

16.30-17.30 Conclusion et discussion générale / Conclusion and General Discussion

pour voir le programme détaillé, cliquez ici

© International Qur’anic Studies Association, 2021. All rights reserved.

Call for Papers: Esotericism and the Qur’an

Esotericism and the Qur’an / L’ésoterisme et le Coran
Unversity of Lausanne & University of Geneva
Lausanne, May 5–7, 2022

Background and Objectives

The Qur’an proclaims itself a message to all humankind (e.g. Q 14:52, This is a proclamation for all mankind . . .). This does not mean, however, that the verses of the Revelation are easy to grasp and comprehend. The Islamic scholarly tradition developed its science of interpretation or commentary on the text, one which emphasizes two areas in particular: (i) language and (ii) the context of the Prophet’s life in which the various verses were revealed. Early commentators sometimes noted that certain aspects were better understood by Arabic-speakers, or that the Companions of the Prophet possessed a superior understand of the message because they were present at its revelation, but by and large the science of interpretation is open to anyone with the necessary intellectual capacity.

There came to be, however, separate from this scholastic science of interpretation, certain communities which associated true understanding of the Qur’an with particular individuals and with certain methods that are not available to all. Esoteric interpretation of the Muslim scripture is best known in various Sufi and Shiite traditions. In these traditions, the ever-present concept of taʾwīl (in the sense of a hermeneutics aimed at a hidden meaning) and the ẓāhir/bāṭin (exterior/interior sense) dichotomy both imply, inescapably, that the Qur’an remains, in a sense, incomplete without the wisdom and experience of certain privileged interpreters.

Methods and doctrines vary considerably among the learned Shiites and the Sufi masters on how to reach or grasp the bāṭin, the hidden inner meaning. There are numerous variations of the Sufi tendency to the immanence of personal meditation, and the Shi’i teaching of the living Imam expressing the hidden sense’s transcendence to a handful of initiates. Certain communities, such as the Ḥurūfīs or the Bektashīs, fruitfully combined these Shi’i and Sufi practices. Early Shiism established a doctrine that was both dual and dualist, according to which the external, apparent form (al-ẓāhir) of the revelation contains a hidden aspect (al-bāṭin), destined only for a handful of the initiated who are able to embrace and protect it. In its dualist conception, this doctrine can go so far as to create an opposition between the people of knowledge and those of ignorance, even assigning to certain historical figures the role of adversary (ḍidd), actively working against the precepts of the community.

The majority of scholarship has tended to treat such groups and tendencies as representing the outer limits, if not the Twilight Zone, of scriptural hermeneutics in Islam. They represent, nonetheless, the practices of a wide range of groups and communities who produced and preserved a substantial corpus of sources spanning at least twelve centuries.

The objective of this conference is to take stock of these esoteric uses of the Qur’an and to examine how they relate to each other and to non-esoteric traditions and methods, to set them in the broader context of Muslim uses and interpretations of the Qur’an.

We invite proposals for conference papers in the following areas: a) the status and role of the Qur’an in intellectual esoterism, be it exegetical, theological, or juridical; b) the hermeneutic of taʾwīl (methods, sources, ijtihād) mobilised by Sufi and Shiite authors in order to comment on certain Qur’anic verses and, from there, the establishment and legitimation of their doctrines, be they of a theological nature (e.g. al-tawḥīd) or juridical (e.g. the status of women); c) the social status of religious figures who are authorized to comment on the Qur’anic text and their role in the perpetuation or renewal of anterior spiritual or legal traditions; d) the correlation between the development of the science of taʾwīl and the intellectual milieu of the authors concerned.

We are particularly interested in contributions that will make the link between these esoteric traditions and those disciplines that are usually considered separately, viz., jurisprudence, theology, and qur’anic interpretation.

Every effort will be made to fund participants’ travel and accommodation costs. 

We are planning to produce a peer-reviewed collection of essays in 2023 (in both English and French). 

Please send an abstract of 200-300 words, in the body of the email message, to the organizers at the addresses below. Deadline for abstracts: 25 June, 2021

Organizers

Prof. Bruce Fudge
Department of Mediterranean, Slavic and Oriental Languages and Literature
University of Geneva, Switzerland
Bruce.Fudge@unige.ch

Prof. Wissam Halawi
Institute of History and Anthropology of Religions
University of Lausanne, Switzerland
wissam.halawi@unil.ch 

© International Qur’anic Studies Association, 2021. All rights reserved.

Call for Submissions: “New Approaches to Qur’anic Hermeneutics in the Muslim World”

religions-logo

The journal Religions is planning a special issue titled “New Approaches to Qur’anic Hermeneutics in the Muslim World,” guest edited by Dr. Hakan Coruh and Dr. Ismail Albayrak. Please see the following announcement for details:

Special Issue Information:

The Qur’an, as a basic Islamic source, and its exegesis have a special place under the broad umbrella of Islamic studies disciplines. In Qur’anic studies, contemporary approaches to Qur’anic exegesis are an area that needs constant updating with the participation of new actors. This Special Issue of the journal Religions (ISSN 2077-1444)—“New approaches to Qur’anic hermeneutics in the Muslim world”—will discuss the approaches that play defining roles in modern Qur’anic interpretation in the Islamic world. It will critically analyze the intellectual efforts to understand the Qur’an in modern times by contemporary Muslim thinkers from different linguistic and geographic backgrounds. The new Qur’an readings, initiated by Sir Sayyid Ahmad Khan (d. 1898) and continued with the works of Muhammad ‘Abduh (d. 1905), have been further developed by important names such as the late Fazlur Rahman (d. 1988), Muhammad Arkoun (d. 2010) and Nasr Hamid Abu Zayd (d. 2010), along with contemporary approaches. The participation of feminist Muslim authors in the discussions on their reading of the Qur’an has further expanded the circle of these contemporary approaches. It is also possible to find similar examples of these approaches based on linguistic and historical hermeneutics in the Shi’ite world. This Special Issue discusses to what extent these and other leading figures represent approaches to the Qur’an in the Muslim world. Is there any study of Qur’an commentary that is suitable for the theoretical ground these new approaches put forward? Or are contemporary efforts in the Islamic world taking place within a framework that goes beyond the above mentioned names? If so, what are the important representatives and methods that have guided recent Qur’an interpretations? The subject will be covered from modern Salafi or literalist approaches to different philosophical readings. This issue will handle the representation and classification questions in contemporary approaches to the Qur’an in a way that includes the general Muslim world from different linguistic and geographic backgrounds.

Submissions: Scholars interested in submitting manuscripts can find complete instructions here.

© International Qur’anic Studies Association, 2021. All rights reserved.

IQSA International Meeting: Format Updates & Reminders

Due to circumstances surrounding the Covid-19 pandemic and travel restrictions, the International Qur’anic Studies Association’s fourth international conference from July 4-11, 2021 hosted by the “Giorgio La Pira” Library will be fully virtual for IQSA members. The Programming Committee extends a thanks to all participants for their understanding and flexibility during these uncertain times.

The deadline for submitting abstracts and panel proposals is today, May 7, 2021! The Palermo IQSA Conference Committee welcomes proposals of single papers as well as panels that gather selected speakers invited by the proponent to present on a specific topic.

Please note that all proposals for single papers must include:

  • Author name and affiliation
  • Paper title
  • 200-word paper abstract (in English)

while proposals for panels must include:

  • Chair name and affiliation
  • Panel title
  • 200-words panel abstract (in English)
  • speakers contacted and selected by the proponent and title of each paper.

Applicants are kindly asked to submit their abstracts to the attention of Dr. Alba Fedeli at iqsa2021@fscire.it, by May 7, 2021. The organizing committee will send a notification of acceptance for abstracts on May 23, 2021.

Should you have any questions regarding the submission of proposals, please contact the conference director, Dr Alba Fedeli, at iqsa2021@fscire.it.

Find more information about registration and the conference theme at this link.

© International Qur’anic Studies Association, 2021. All rights reserved.

IQSA International Meeting CfP Deadline Approaching

Friends of IQSA,

A friendly reminder that the Call for Papers deadline for IQSA’s fourth biennial International Meeting held in partnership with the “Giorgio La Pira” Library and Research Centre in Palermo, Sicily has been extended, and all paper and panel proposals are due this Friday May 7th, 2021.The organizing committee will send a notification of acceptance for abstracts by May 23, 2021.

Please note that all proposals for single papers must include:

  • Author name and affiliation
  • Paper title
  • 200-word paper abstract (in English)

while proposals for panels must include:

  • Chair name and affiliation
  • Panel title
  • 200-words panel abstract (in English)
  • speakers contacted and selected by the proponent and title of each paper.

Applicants are kindly asked to submit their abstracts to the attention of Dr. Alba Fedeli at iqsa2021@fscire.it. 

Conference registration fees are structured as follows:

  • Students to assistant professors – IQSA members: $50 USD / Non-IQSA members: $100 USD
  • Associate professors and above – IQSA members $75 USD / Non-IQSA members: $150 USD
  • Members of the public – $150 USD
  • Affiliates to the “Giorgio La Pira” Library will receive a special code for registration.

The event registration page is https://members.iqsaweb.org/event-4189882

Individuals in the Global South interested in attending the conference should email contactus@iqsaweb.org for accommodations. Any other questions concerning the registration process should also be addressed to contactus@iqsaweb.org.

The organizing committee thanks the IQSA community for its understanding and flexibility during these extraordinary times, and looks forward to convening in July!

Copyright © 2021 International Qur’anic Studies Association, All rights reserved.